What are Model Systems? (2)

Professor David Van Vactor explains that model systems are simple organisms that allow us to study and manipulate gene function and development.

Model systems are simple organisms that share a common design principle with our more complex human, mammalian, vertebrate body plan and molecular mechanism. But they�€™re very accessible to manipulation, to really understand fundamental mechanisms of cellular function, development, and are often a very helpful way to explore questions in greater detail.

model, system, organism, gene, function, molecular, molecule, mechanism, cell, development, manipulation, david, van, vactor

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