Biography 22: Har Gobind Khorana (1922 - )

Har Khorana was born in Raipur, West Pakistan. His father was a clerk in the British Indian government. Although the family was not well-to-do, Khorana's father made sure that his children had an education.

Khorana went to Punjab University in Lahore and graduated with a Master of Science. In 1945, a fellowship from the government of India gave him the opportunity to study abroad. He went to the University of Liverpool where he obtained his doctorate.

Khorana spent the next few years doing post-doctorate work, first at the Eidgen�ssische Technische Hochschule in Zurich, then at Cambridge University with G. W. Kenner and Lord Alexander R. Todd. It was at Cambridge that Khorana developed an interest in proteins and nucleic acids.

In 1952, Khorana was offered a job at the University of British Columbia where he was able to work fairly independently on various research projects involving phosphate esters and nucleic acids. The work on the chemical synthesis of ribotrinucleotides for protein synthesis was initiated at this time.

In 1960, Khorana accepted a position in the Institute for Enzyme Research at the University of Wisconsin. He continued working on nucleotide synthesis and cracking the genetic code. For this work Khorana shared the 1968 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Robert Holley and Marshall Nirenberg.

Since 1970, Khorana has been the Alfred P. Sloan Professor of Biology and Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Har Gobind Khorana, Marshall Nirenberg, and Robert Holley shared the 1968 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine. Nirenberg and Khorana cracked the genetic code. Holley sequenced and deduced the structure of the first tRNA molecule.

har gobind khorana, marshall nirenberg, trna molecule, phosphate esters, nucleotide synthesis, protein synthesis, chemical synthesis, west pakistan, enzyme research, nucleic acids, nobel prize, cambridge university, genetic code

  • ID: 16512
  • Source: DNALC.DNAFTB

Related Content

16511. Biography 22: Marshall Warren Nirenberg (1927- )

Marshall Nirenberg, Har Gobind Khorana, and Robert Holley shared the 1968 Nobel Prize for Physiology and Medicine. Nirenberg and Khorana cracked the genetic code. Holley sequenced and deduced the structure of the first tRNA molecule.

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNAFTB

15356. Determining the nucleotide sequences of all RNA codons, Marshall Nirenberg

Marshall Nirenberg talks about Gobind Khorana, who synthesized many of the triplets needed to finish the decoding process.

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNAi

16494. Animation 22: DNA words are three letters long.

Several researchers crack the genetic code.

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNALC.DNAFTB

16499. Gallery 22: Har Gobind Khorana, Francis Crick, Marianne Grunberg-Manago, 1966

1966 Cold Spring Harbor Symposium on protein synthesis. (L-R) Har Gobind Khorana, Francis Crick, Marianne Grunberg-Manago.

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNAFTB

15883. The other codons: Nirenberg and the genetic code

After the easy codons, exact triplets had to be made in order to finish deciphering the rest. Marshall Nirenberg and a group of scientists including Maxine Singer, Marianne Grunberg-Manago, Phil Leder were involved in this process. Har Gobind Khorana al

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNAi

15347. Cell-free protein synthesis, Marshall Nirenberg

Marshall Nirenberg talks about cell-free protein synthesis.

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNAi

15350. The RNA code for phenylalanine, Marshall Nirenberg

Marshall Nirenberg talks about the RNA code for phenylalanine.

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNAi

15695. Har Gobind Khorana

Har Gobind Khorana, University of Wisconscin.

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNAi

16489. Biography 21: Paul Charles Zamecnik (1913-)

Paul Zamecnik developed a cell-free extract that he and Mahlon Hoagland used to study protein synthesis. They identified tRNA as the adaptor predicted by Francis Crick in his Central Dogma

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNAFTB

16471. Animation 21: RNA is an intermediary between DNA and protein.

Francis Crick describes RNA and its role and Paul Zamecnick explains protein synthesis.

  • ID: 16512
  • Type: non-journal article
  • Source: DNALC.DNAFTB