Biology & 3D Animation Library

Polymerase Chain Reaction (Video)

Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) enables researchers to produce millions of copies of a specific DNA sequence in approximately two hours. This automated process bypasses the need to use bacteria for amplifying DNA.

This animation is featured in our "Spotlight Collection" on Polymerase Chain Reaction, along with video interviews with Kary Mullis, a 3D molecular animation of PCR, and several laboratory protocols.

This animation is also available as INTERACTIVE MEDIA .

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15624. Kary Mullis

Image of Kary Mullis. In 1985, Kary Mullis invented the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a method of amplifying or producing many copies of a specific piece of DNA. The revelation came to this eccentric character on a drive in northern California.

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15140. Making many DNA copies, Kary Mullis

Kary Mullis talks about his discovery of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR), a process that allows chemists to produce many copies of a specific fragment of DNA.

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16812. Animation 39: A genome is an entire set of genes.

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Fred Sanger outlines DNA sequencing.

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