Science Summer Camps

The DNALC is the world's first science center devoted entirely to genetics education. Each summer, we offer fun and challenging camps at each of our locations for science enthusiasts entering 6th–12th grade grade. Guided by experienced instructors, students use sophisticated laboratory and computer equipment to perform experiments several grade levels ahead of their peers.

Registration will open in winter 2020. See sample schedule below:

 
DOLAN DNA LEARNING CENTER in Cold Spring Harbor
DATE
LAB 1
LAB 2
LAB 3
LAB 4
COMPUTER LAB
July 1-5*
Genome Science
World of Enzymes
Fun with DNA
Green Genes
NO CAMP
July 8-12
DNA Science
NO CAMP
Forensic Detectives
Fun with DNA
BioCoding
July 15-19

Restricted to International Camp Collaborators

DNA Barcoding

Restricted to International Camp Collaborators

Green Genes
BioCoding
July 22-26
DNA Science
World of Enzymes
NO CAMP
July 29-August 2
DNA Science
Fun with DNA
NO CAMP
August 5-9
DNA Science
Being Human
World of Enzymes
Green Genes
NO CAMP
August 12-16
DNA Science
DNA Barcoding
Fun with DNA
World of Enzymes
NO CAMP
August 19-23
Green Genes
Genome Science
Forensic Detectives
Fun with DNA
NO CAMP
August 26-30
DNA Science
World of Enzymes
Fun with DNA
Green Genes
NO CAMP

 

DATE
DNALC NYC at City Tech, Brooklyn
Cold Spring Harbor Lab Main Campus
DNALC West, Lake Success

July 1-5*
NO CAMP
NO CAMP
Fun with DNA
July 8-12 Fun with DNA
NO CAMP
World of Enzymes
July 15-19 DNA Science
NO CAMP
DNA Science
July 22-26 World of Enzymes
NO CAMP
Green Genes
July 29- August 2 Green Genes
NO CAMP
Fun with DNA
August 5-9
DNA Science
NO CAMP
DNA Science
August 12-16
DNA Barcoding
NO CAMP
Forensic Detectives
August 19-23
Fun with DNA
NO CAMP
Fun with DNA
August 26-30
NO CAMP
WISE Fun with DNA for girls
World of Enzymes

*July 1-5: Camps in this week are scheduled for four days due to the Independence Day holiday;
there will be no class on Thursday, July 4th.

Camp Prerequisites Typical Hours Tuition
Fun with DNA entering grade 6 or 7 Mon-Thurs 9:30-2:30,
Fri is +Parent Participation Day, times vary
$520
WiSE Fun with DNA for girls entering grade 6 or 7 Mon-Thurs 9:30-4:00,
Fri is +Parent Participation Day, times vary
$625
World of Enzymes entering grade 8 or Fun With DNA alumni entering grade 7 Mon-Thurs 9:30-2:30,
Fri is +Parent Participation Day, times vary
$520
Green Genes entering grade 9 or World of Enzymes alumni entering grade 8 Mon-Thurs 9:30-2:30,
Fri is +Parent Participation Day, times vary
$520
Forensic Detectives entering grade 9 or 10 Mon-Thurs 9:30-2:30,
Fri is +Parent Participation Day, times vary
$520
Being Human entering grades 10-12 Mon-Thurs 9:30-4:00,
Fri 9:30-2:00
$600
DNA Science entering grades 10-12 Mon-Thurs 9:30-4:00,
Fri 9:30-2:00
$600
DNA Barcoding DNA Science alumni entering grades 10-12 Mon-Thurs 9:30-4:00,
Fri 9:30-2:00
$600
BioCoding DNA Science alumni (or comparable experience) entering grades 11-12 Mon-Thurs 9:30-4:00,
Fri 9:30-2:00
$600
Genome Science DNA Science alumni entering grades 11-12 Mon-Thurs 9:30-4:00,
Fri 9:30-2:00
$600

+ Times for Parent Participation Days vary; see schedule below for times for your child's camp.

Times for Parent Participation Days

Parent Participation Days are held on the Friday of each middle school level camp, beginning at 9:30 a.m or 11:30 a.m. The exception is the week of the Independence Day holiday*. See below for the time for your child's camp. Be sure you are checking the correct camp location!

 
DOLAN DNA LEARNING CENTER in Cold Spring Harbor
DATE
LAB 1
LAB 2
LAB 3
LAB 4
COMPUTER LAB
July 1-5*
Genome Science
World of Enzymes
Parent Day: 2:30pm
Fun with DNA
Parent Day: 2:30pm
Green Genes
Parent Day: 2:30pm
NO CAMP
July 8-12
DNA Science
NO CAMP
Forensic Detectives
Parent Day: 11:30am
Fun with DNA
Parent Day: 9:30am
BioCoding
July 15-19

Restricted to International Camp Collaborators

DNA Barcoding

Restricted to International Camp Collaborators

Green Genes
Parent Day: 9:30am
BioCoding
July 22-26
DNA Science
World of Enzymes
Parent Day: 9:30am
NO CAMP
July 29-August 2
DNA Science
Fun with DNA
Parent Day: 9:30am
NO CAMP
August 5-9
DNA Science
Being Human
World of Enzymes
Parent Day: 9:30am
Green Genes
Parent Day: 11:30am
NO CAMP
August 12-16
DNA Science
DNA Barcoding
Fun with DNA
Parent Day: 9:30am
World of Enzymes
Parent Day: 11:30am
NO CAMP
August 19-23
Green Genes
Parent Day: 9:30am
Genome Science
Forensic Detectives
Parent Day: 11:30am
Fun with DNA
Parent Day: 9:30am
NO CAMP
August 26-30
DNA Science
World of Enzymes
Parent Day: 9:30am
Fun with DNA
Parent Day: 9:30am
Green Genes
Parent Day: 11:30am
NO CAMP

 

DATE
DNALC NYC at City Tech, Brooklyn
Cold Spring Harbor Lab Main Campus
DNALC West, Lake Success

July 1-5*
NO CAMP
NO CAMP
Fun with DNA
CANCELLED
July 8-12
Fun with DNA
CANCELLED
NO CAMP
World of Enzymes
Parent Day: 9:30am
July 15-19
DNA Science
NO CAMP
DNA Science
July 22-26
World of Enzymes
CANCELLED
NO CAMP
Green Genes
Parent Day: 9:30am
July 29- August 2
Green Genes
CANCELLED
NO CAMP
Fun with DNA
Parent Day: 9:30am
August 5-9
DNA Science
NO CAMP
DNA Science
August 12-16
DNA Barcoding
NO CAMP
Forensic Detectives
Parent Day: 9:30am
August 19-23
Fun with DNA
Parent Day: 9:30am
NO CAMP
Fun with DNA
Parent Day: 9:30am
August 26-30
NO CAMP
WISE Fun with DNA for girls
Parent Day: 9:30am
World of Enzymes
Parent Day: 9:30am

Summer Camp Frequently Asked Questions

Enrollment

What is the grade level of campers?
When a student has completed fifth grade he/she is eligible to apply for Fun with DNA, the first of the summer camp series. We offer courses through grade 12 and higher.
My child is extremely bright and advanced for their age. Can they be enrolled in a higher level camp than their grade level?
The majority of our campers are very intelligent and camp levels are structured accordingly. For this reason, we do not make exceptions.
Can my child enroll in more than one camp this summer?
Please read the list of camp prerequisites and grade levels (under Schedule & Quick Reference at left). In some cases, your child will be eligible to take more than one camp during the same summer.
I enrolled online and did not receive confirmation of enrollment or payment.
Confirmations are automatically generated and sent to the email address you entered during registration. Please confirm that you have entered the correct address.
How will I be notified that my child has been accepted into the camp of choice?
After receipt of your application and payment you will receive a confirmation email with all pertinent camp information.

Payment

How do I pay for a space in a camp?
Payment must be made by credit card, and the camp space will be held immediately. The charge will appear on the statement as "DNA Learning Center". Please remember to inform others using the credit card or reviewing the credit card statement that it is for a camp payment. Unfortunately, due to the expense and time involved to resolve disputed fees, it has become necessary to initiate the following: If you contact your credit card company because you do not recognize the summer camp tuition charged to your account, the funds are then held and are not available to us to cover tuition. At that point your camp enrollment will be CANCELLED. You will have to re-enroll and we cannot guarantee that your original camp choice will be available.

After Registration

How do I switch a camp date?
You can switch camp dates online within the My Account section of this site. Once you have registered your child for a camp, there will be a choice under the Completed Applications section to CHANGE CAMPS. You may switch dates up to three weeks prior to the start of the camp.
What is the summer camp cancellation policy?
All cancellation requests for paid applications must be in writing (email or letter*) and signed by parent or guardian (you can request cancellation of a registration through your DNALC Camp account). To be eligible for a refund, cancellation requests must be received by the DNA Learning Center a minimum of three weeks prior to the session start date – with no exceptions. For cancellation requests received after June 1st, a $75 administrative fee will be deducted from each refund. You will receive confirmation of your cancellation.

*To request cancellation by email, write to dnalc-camps@cshl.edu and include camper's name, camp, camp date, and unique four character code in the email. Send printed letters to DNA Learning Center – Summer Camps, 1 Bungtown Road, Cold Spring Harbor, NY 11724.
When will I receive my refund after cancellation?
The DNALC can issue refunds (minus $75 if your request is after June 1st) directly to your credit card if it has been less than 60 days since your payment. Please allow 2-4 business days for processing refunds. If it has been more than 60 days since your payment, we will issue a check.

CSHL, Northwell Health, and City Tech Employee Discounts

As an employee of Northwell Health, am I eligible for reduced tuition?
A 20% tuition rebate is available to children of Northwell Health employees attending a camp only at the DNA Learning Center West location in Lake Success. The does not extend to grandchildren, nieces, nephews, etc.
As an employee of CUNY City Tech, am I eligible for reduced tuition?
A 20% tuition rebate is available to children of CUNY City Tech employees attending a camp only at the DNA Learning Center NYC at City Tech location in Brooklyn. The does not extend to grandchildren, nieces, nephews, etc.
As an employee of Northwell Health or City Tech, how do I apply for a rebate?
Once you have completed an application, pay for the camp in full. If you have indicated that you are a Northwell Health or City Tech employee, there will be a link on the My Account page to request a 20% rebate. You will be required to enter your department and employee identification number. DNALC staff will then verify your employment and your My Account page will be updated with the status of your request. Deadline date to request the rebate is September 6, 2019 – with no exceptions.
When will I receive my rebate?
After the student has completed the camp, the rebate will be credited to the credit card used if it has been less than 60 days since payment. A check will be issued if it has been more than 60 days since payment.
As a Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory employee, am I eligible for a discount?
Yes. A discount is available to children of Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory employees attending a camp at the Dolan DNA Learning Center in Cold Spring Harbor. The discount does not extend to grandchildren, nieces, nephews, etc. You will receive payment instructions in the Labwide announcement when enrollment begins. The deadline date to request your discount is September 6, 2019.

When Camp Begins...

Who do I notify if my child will be absent or late?
Please call the Dolan DNA Learning Center office at 516-367-5170 by 9:45 a.m. and provide your child's name and the camp he/she is attending. We will notify the camp instructor. Please understand that we cannot give prorated refunds for missed camp days.
Where are the camps located?
Visit the DNALC.org site for directions to the Dolan DNA Learning Center (which is not on the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory main campus), DNA Learning Center West, and the Harlem DNA Lab. Be sure to note the location of the camp for which your child is registered.
Can my child purchase lunch at the camp locations?
Food and drinks are not available for purchase at the camp locations. Students should bring lunch in a container labeled with their name. There is a refrigerator for lunches that are sent in paper bags.
Do you offer transportation or lodging?
No, we do not offer transportation or lodging.
When is Parent Participation Day?
Although Parent Participation Day is usually on Friday, there are exceptions. Specific Parent Participation Day information for middle school camps is posted on the Parent Participation Days Calendar.

2019 Summer Camp Locations:

Dolan DNA Learning Center

DNALC NYC at City Tech

Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory

DNA Learning Center West

Fun with DNA

Fun with DNA is an entry-level course in DNA science. This camp is designed especially for highly motivated students interested in expanding their knowledge of basic genetics and cell biology. Students are immersed in an environment of hands on activities and laboratory experiments designed to increase genetic literacy, encourage critical and creative thinking, and spark interest in the field of biotechnology. Students will:

  • construct cell and DNA models;
  • use compound microscopes to view various cell types;
  • extract DNA from their own cells and from plants;
  • use stereo microscopes to observe mutations in fruit flies; and
  • genetically engineer bacteria cells with firefly genes.

Details:

  • Grades: entering 6 or 7 (Fun with DNA is a prerequisite for World of Enzymes)
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • Parent Day is on Friday, see schedule
  • $520 per student

Women in Science & Engineering (WiSE)

Fun with DNA

Calling all WiSE girls! Fun with DNA is an entry-level course in DNA science. This camp is designed for highly motivated girls interested in expanding their knowledge of basic genetics and cell biology. Students are immersed in hands on activities and laboratory experiments designed to increase genetic literacy, encourage critical and creative thinking, and spark interest in the field of biotechnology. The week concludes with Parent Participation Day, when the young women in science become teachers and explain the week's activities.

With support from WiSE, participants will have the unique opportunity to tour the Laboratory's campus, meet CSHL women in science to learn about  current research at the lab, and most importantly, be inspired to pursue their interest in science! Students will:

  • construct cell and DNA models;
  • extract DNA from plant and cells;
  • use stereo microscopes to observe mutations in fruit flies and roundworms;
  • genetically engineer bacteria cells with firefly genes;
  • tour the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory campus and see real research labs;
  • interact with female scientists who study cancer, plant biology, and more.

Details:

  • Grades: entering 6 or 7
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m.
  • Parent Day is on Friday, 9:30 a.m.–11:30 a.m.
  • $625 per student
  • Held on the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory campus

Fun with DNA is a prerequisite for World of Enzymes.

World of Enzymes

Developed as a sequel to the popular Fun with DNA camp, World of Enzymes builds on basic concepts of biochemistry and molecular biology and enables students to utilize advanced techniques to manipulate DNA. Through direct observation and manipulation of enzymes, participants develop an understanding of the importance of proteins, not only in living things, but also in recombinant DNA technology, cloning, and industry. Participants will:

  • build molecular models;
  • observe enzymes in action that are used for food production and healthcare;
  • use enzymes to cut and splice DNA;
  • analyze DNA fragments with gel electrophoresis; and
  • make a personal DNA fingerprint.

Details:

  • Grades: entering grade 8, or Fun with DNA alumni entering grade 7
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • Parent Day is on Friday, see schedule
  • $520 per student

Green Genes

Green Genes is a challenging summer camp designed to apply the knowledge gained in Fun with DNA and World of Enzymes. In this biotechnology camp, students learn more about the practical applications of recombinant DNA technology.

Through a series of lab experiments, students utilize many of the same techniques employed by pharmaceutical companies to produce human insulin. Through cloning and expressing Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP), normally found in the Pacific jellyfish Aequoria Victoria, students work each day towards a final goal of extracting and purifying a jellyfish protein from genetically engineered bacteria. Each experiment acts as a stepping stone for the next day's work, requiring students to demonstrate proper lab techniques. Students will:

  • use enzymes to cut and paste genes to form a functional plasmid;
  • analyze results with gel electrophoresis;
  • genetically engineer bacteria to produce a visible protein;
  • use polymerase chain reaction to amplify DNA fragments; and
  • isolate and purify GFP using chromatography.

Details:

  • Grades: entering grade 9 or World of Enzymes alumni entering grade 8
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • Parent Day is on Friday, see schedule
  • $520 per student

Forensic Detectives

With the popularity of shows such as Crime Scene Investigation (CSI) the true nature of forensic science is often glamorized. As a result, TV viewers don’t have a true understanding of the field. Although DNA fingerprinting is a useful technique for forensic scientists, it certainly isn’t the only method used to solve crimes. Through a series of forensic labs and activities, participants will experience forensics in a more realistic fashion than conveyed during prime time. Participants will:

  • use techniques employed by CSI experts to analyze a "crime scene" and collect evidence such as fibers, fingerprints, footprints, hair, and blood;
  • explore areas of forensic science including pathology, entomology, and forensic profiling;
  • investigate the science behind evidence like fingerprints and blood spatter;
  • perform a real DNA analysis and interpret the results;
  • learn about different techniques used for DNA analysis and discuss the pros and cons of this type of evidence.

Details:

  • Grades: entering grade 9 or 10
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • Parent Day is on Friday, see schedule
  • $520 per student

DNA Science

The inauguration of the Human Genome Project in 1988 marked the beginning of a national commitment to apply DNA technology toward understanding human health and development. Biologists have gained the extraordinary ability to dissect any of the approximately 30,000 genes that compose human chromosomes. Tracing the molecular pathway through which hereditary information flows between DNA, RNA, and protein has added rich detail to our understanding of how human life develops from fertilized egg to adulthood.

The abstract nature of molecular genetics can best be overcome by approaching the subject in the same manner as scientists - by asking questions and doing experiments. The DNA Science curriculum introduces high school and college students with little or no research experience in molecular genetics to the elegant tools of modern biotechnology, and is centered around laboratory work. Each experiment acts as a stepping stone for the next. Students begin with the basic techniques of DNA restriction, transformation, and isolation; then apply them to the construction and analysis of a simple recombinant. Students will:

  • examine bacterial growth curves using the E.coli genetic system;
  • evaluate the difference between the rapid and classical method of bacterial transformation by calculating transformation efficiencies using pAMP and pKAN plasmids;
  • perform a restriction analysis and gel electrophoresis, then graph the results to understand COS sites; and
  • digest plasmids with restriction enzymes, ligate the fragments together, then transform the recombinant-DNA, and finally perform a plasmid minipreparation of the new recombinant to identify how it originally ligated.

Details:

  • Grades: entering grades 10-12
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m., Friday 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • $600 per student

Being Human

Physical anthropologists combine biological and cultural research to study how humans developed and how that history shapes our existence. The legacy of seven million years of hominin evolution impacts us in many ways, including our health, genetics, and appearance. Meanwhile, our extensive cultural development sets us apart from other animals and constantly impacts our lives.

In this introductory anthropology camp, participants will examine how physical, biochemical, fossil, and cultural evidence can be used to build a picture of how humans evolved. Labs explore early human evolution, modern human variation, and the interaction of biology and culture. Students will:

  • test hypotheses about human evolution using modern anthropometric and physiological lab techniques;
  • investigate what Ötzi the Iceman, a 5300-year-old mummy from Italy, tells us about how our ancestors lived in the Copper Age;
  • analyze their own DNA to better understand human migration across the globe and identify DNA variations that played a role in our evolution; and
  • examine materials from the eugenics movement to learn how misunderstandings about genetic variation in modern humans were used inappropriately to engineer American society.

Details:

  • Grades: entering grade 9 or 10
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m., Friday 9:30 a.m.–2:30 p.m.
  • $600 per student

DNA Barcoding

Experience the process of science in this project-based camp.  A short "DNA barcode" (about 600 nucleotides in length) is a unique pattern of DNA sequence that can potentially identify any living thing. DNA barcoding projects allow students to link molecular genetics to ecology and evolution—with the potential to contribute new scientific knowledge about biodiversity, conservation biology, and human effects on the environment. Students will:

  • Extract and amplify DNA from tissue samples;
  • Use computers to analyze DNA sequences and identify species of origin;
  • Create phylogenetic trees to display genetic and evolutionary relationship; and
  • Complete an open-ended project to investigate food fraud or study biodiversity.

Details:

  • Grades: DNA Science alumni entering grades 10 and up
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m., Friday 9:30 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
  • $600 per student

BioCoding

Computers have revolutionized almost every aspect of our lives, including life science research. Unfortunately, a visit to most science classrooms would leave you with the impression that biology is only about microscopes and dissections. In fact, biology is in the middle of its biggest "revolution" as bioinformatics — the use of computing technologies to manage and understand biological data—changes how we understand everything from genomes to ecosystems.

This camp introduces the basic skills necessary for bioinformatics and will equip motivated students with knowledge that will serve them well after the course is completed. Participating students should have an introductory knowledge of biology, but little to no knowledge of computer programming or bioinformatics is required. Basic typing proficiency and a strong interest in problem solving is recommended. Students will also learn basic molecular biology techniques with a hands-on laboratory to isolate and sequence DNA from biological samples; the data generated will be analyzed using common bioinformatics techniques, tools, and databases. Students will:

  • learn about and use the Linux operating system;
  • write computer programs in the Python programming language;
  • extract and sequence DNA samples in the lab using PCR;
  • manipulate and analyze DNA and protein sequence data; and
  • explore online biological sequence databases.

Details:

  • Grades: entering grade 11 or higher and have taken DNA Science or have a high level of training in the sciences (documentation required)
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m., Friday 9:30 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
  • $600 per student

Genome Science

The term genome was coined in 1920 by the German botanist Hans Winkler. A combination of the words gene and chromosome, a genome is the set of genes located on one or more chromosomes that defines a living organism. The concept of a genome has been expanded to mean the entire sequence of DNA nucleotides or "letters" (ATGC) that compose the genetic information within an organism's set of chromosomes, or all of it's genes. Complete genome sequences are now available for humans and many plants and animals. With this information in hand, the next step is for scientists to understand the physiological functions of the thousands of genes for which little is known beyond their sequences.

In this camp, participants will use Nobel Prize-winning technologies to analyze the genetic complement of several organisms. Lab work will include:

  • using PCR (polymerase chain reaction) and DNA sequencing to explore variations in the human genome—and then bioinformatics to explore human origins and migrations with the data;
  • using PCR to explore the relationship between genotype and phenotype for a taste receptor that affects the ability to taste the bitter chemical phenylthiocarbamide (PTC);
  • using PCR to identify genetically modified plants and food products;
  • using methylation-sensitive enzymes to explore epigenetics—heritable changes in gene expression—that affect flowering in Arabidopsis; and
  • using online bioinformatic tools for genomic analysis and gene mapping.

Details:

  • Grades: strictly limited to students entering grade 11 or higher, and have taken DNA Science or have a high level of training in the sciences (documentation required)
  • Monday to Thursday 9:30 a.m.–4:00 p.m., Friday 9:30 a.m.–2:00 p.m.
  • $600 per student

STARS (Science Technology & Research Scholars) STEM Program for Minority Students

STARS is a two-week summer research experience designed to support the next generation of minority scientists, doctors, and other health professionals. This program provides students with state-of-the-art laboratory and computer science skills needed to succeed in STEM (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) in college and beyond.

Students conduct hands-on science and computer projects and participate in enrichment activities including discussions with researchers and tours of the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory and Stony Brook University campuses. After the two-week program, students also have a line of communication to mentors who can provide advice on finding future research experiences and preparing for college.

Classes run Monday through Friday, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. (Stony Brook field trip day concludes at 6:00 p.m.). No transportation is provided; parents are responsible for on-time drop-off and pickup.

Students build skills in three areas:

  • Molecular Biology
    • Acquire basic biological/biomedical laboratory skills such as laboratory safety, DNA extraction and analysis, DNA sequencing, and other molecular biology techniques
    • Work on a complete research project using DNA barcoding to identify species of invertebrates, insects or plants in their environment
  • Coding and Data Science
    • Learn the basics of computer coding (in the Python language) and fundamental data science skills
    • Learn how to write code in order to analyze biological data
  • Science and Career Skills for Success
    • Understand how to develop science research questions
    • Communicate the results of research, including writing, speaking, and presentation skills
    • Explore career opportunities in science and understand how to prepare for success (writing a resume, finding a mentor, effective study techniques)

Eligibility:

The STARS program is limited to students who are underrepresented minorities in STEM (defined by the National Science Foundation as Black or African American; American Indian or Native Alaskan; Hispanic or Latino; and Native Pacific Islander); eligible students have completed the 9th grade.

All accepted students have the $1,200 tuition waived. As part of their service as scholars, students have a community engagement responsibility, including a presentation at the end of their research experience and helping to recruit and support future STAR scholars.

Application Requirements:

Potential required materials for future camps:

  • A personal statement on why students want to apply (500 words or less).
  • A copy of their latest report card OR a letter of recommendation from a science, math, technology or other STEM teacher.

Applications are reviewed on a weekly basis until July 31, 2019, or until the camp is full. Qualified applicants are typically approved within 7 days (usually on Fridays). Applications submitted after the camp fills will be waitlisted.

Contact Jason Williams at the DNA Learning Center at williams@cshl.edu with questions.

Details:

  • Held on the Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory campus and/or at the DNA Learning Center
  • Monday through Friday, from 9:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m.(Stony Brook field trip day will conclude at 6:00 p.m.)
  • Scholarships available
  • Application procedures to be determined for future camps